Championing Dyslexia Awareness & Advocacy Across Africa

Did you ever sit in a class with that mate who couldn’t write their own name? Did you ever teach a child whose performance was so abysmal you wondered if they even understood a thing you taught? Do you have a child who is a low performer in academic work? Are you wondering what is wrong with such a child but have never found the answers? Have you already concluded that the child is lazy, dumb, good for nothing, or that he/she can never amount to anything? Do you know about Dyslexia?

DO YOU HAVE DYSLEXIA?

Dyslexia is a specific neurobiological learning disability characterised by difficulties with accurate and/or fluent word recognition and poor spelling and decoding abilities. People diagnosed with dyslexia have normal intelligence, are smart and hardworking and are capable of succeeding in school without a specialised education program. There is no cure for dyslexia. However, early intervention and assessment can make a difference.

 Do you think you may have dyslexia? Click below to take a self-assessment screener 

WHO WE ARE

The African Dyslexia Organization is a non-profit that focuses its efforts on providing help for dyslexic people by raising awareness, providing educational tools, framework and support.

We put quality first in delivering a comprehensive and effective professional service for dyslexic people and those with specific learning differences on a non-for profit basis across education, governance, policy and training facilitations. 

Africa Dyslexia Organisation focuses its work on sustainable development goal 4 “Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all” and goal 10 “Reducing inequalities and ensuring no one is left behind”

Mission

To empower dyslexics and others with reading differences to become productive citizens whilst avoiding their marginalization in formal education and in the labour market.

Vision

To build a world-class organization dedicated to helping dyslexic people and those with specific learning differences across the Continent of Africa.

SUPPORT OUR CAUSE

Free dyslexia diagnosis children fund

Help get free dyslexia diagnosis for children, All donations go directly to making a difference for our cause.

₵ 255 of ₵ 10,000 raised
Personal Info

Donation Total: ₵ 100.00

Testimonials

Mrs Biney

Mother
4.5/5

Rosalin I like to thank you from my heart and tell you how happy I was with the answers I received to my questions when I call in to your office. My son who has dyslexia after the assessment is doing pretty now with your recommendations.

4.5/5

I want to thank you for your wonderful program. I have learned so much from you and now about to help my son with the resources you have given me.

Mr Danson

Father

FEATURED IN

MODERN GHANA

What Every Parent Needs To Know About Dyslexia

AUDIBLE

Rosalin Abigail Kyere-Nartey
podcast

GHANAWEB

What every parent needs to know about Dyslexia

MODERN GHANA

Dyslexia Awareness Month: Ensuring No Child Is Left Behind

citinewsroom

Africa Dyslexia Organization launches nationwide awareness campaign

the bft online

Dyslexia is not a myth

AGOO TV

Dyslexia Conversation

GTV

Don’t lose future talents, know dyslexia

THE A SHOW

A SHOW, LIVING WITH DYSLEXIA

OUR MERCHANDISE

Support our good cause by purchasing our mechandise

100% of the profit we make go into a good cause
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WHO ARE YOU TO THE CHILD ?

The Adult Reading History Questionnaire (ARHQ) is a screening tool designed to measure risk of reading disability (i.e. dyslexia) in adults (Lefly & Pennington, 2000), but it can also help measure risk in children, especially before school age. Reading disability is highly heritable: about 30-60% percent of children born to a dyslexic parent will develop dyslexia. Thus, one way to estimate risk of reading disability in preschool children is to evaluate parents’ own reading history. The following questionnaire was developed using parents’ reports of their own reading history as well as actual testing of their children’s reading skills. If a parent scores high on the ARHQ, their child has a higher risk of developing a reading disability. It is important to note that the ARHQ is only a screener and does not constitute a formal evaluation or diagnosis of either the parent or the child. If you have concerns about your child’s reading progress, we recommend that you contact your child’s school, a licensed child psychologist, or your child’s primary care physician about pursuing a more thorough evaluation to investigate the nature of these concerns.

The Colorado Learning Disabilities Questionnaire – Reading Subscale (CLDQ-R) is a screening tool designed to measure risk of reading disability (i.e. dyslexia) in school-age children (Willcutt, Boada, Riddle, Chhabildas, DeFries & Pennington, 2011). Normative scores for this questionnaire were developed based on parent-reports of their 6-18 year-old children, as well as actual reading testing of these children. Willcutt, et al. (2011) found that the CLDQ-R is reliable and valid. It is important to note that the CLDQ-R is only a screener and does not constitute a formal evaluation or diagnosis. If you have concerns about your child’s reading progress, we recommend that you contact your child’s school, a licensed child psychologist, or your child’s primary care physician about pursuing a more thorough evaluation to investigate the nature of these concerns. For more information about the symptoms, causes and treatment of reading disability (dyslexia), please visit the International Dyslexia Association

WHAT'S YOUR GENDER?

The Adult Reading History Questionnaire (ARHQ) is a self-report screening tool designed to measure risk of reading disability (i.e. dyslexia) in adults (Lefly & Pennington, 2000). The ARHQ asks adults about their own reading history and current reading habits in order to estimate the risk that they may have a reading disability. Normative scores are based on actual testing, and Lefly & Pennington (2000) found that the ARHQ is reliable and valid. It is important to note that the ARHQ is only a screener and does not constitute a formal evaluation or diagnosis. If you have concerns about your reading skills, we recommend that you contact a licensed psychologist or your primary care physician about pursuing a more thorough evaluation to investigate the nature of these concerns.