What to know about Dyslexia

OVERVIEW

Dyslexia is a specific neurobiological learning disability characterised by difficulties with accurate and/or fluent word recognition and poor spelling and decoding abilities. People diagnosed with dyslexia have normal intelligence, are smart and hardworking and are capable of succeeding in school without a specialised education program. There is no cure for dyslexia. However, early intervention and assessment can make a difference.

Dyslexia is one of the most common learning difficulties  – also known as learning disabilities. There are different types of dyslexia but the most common type is phonological dyslexia which affects the way people break words down into their component parts.
This has consequences for decoding in reading and can also cause spelling and writing difficulties. Because reading and writing are central to the most school curriculum, children with undiagnosed dyslexia can quickly fall behind their peers as they experience problems with note-taking, reading, homework, writing assignments and assessments.

Dyslexia is not associated with lower intelligence, but language difficulties can cause children to believe they are less intelligent than their peers and result in low confidence and a poor self-image. Some common signs of dyslexia include problems reading out loud, inconsistent spelling – they may be able to spell a word one day and not the next – losing one’s place on a page, a poor grasp of phonics, halted writing due to trouble with spelling, and a vocabulary that’s more limited in scope.

Some common signs of dyslexia include:

  • Problems reading out loud
  • Inconsistent spelling – they may be able to spell a word one day and not the next
  • Losing one’s place on a page
  • A poor grasp of phonics
  • Halted writing due to trouble with spelling
  • Vocabulary that is more limited in scope.

 

COMMON MYTHS AND MISCONCEPTIONS ABOUT DYSLEXIA

This is not true because many young children learning how to read and write reverse letters a lot of times. Moreover, a child can be dyslexic and not reverse letters. Children with dyslexia have a language processing deficit, connecting speech sounds with written letters or groups of letters, resulting in difficulty with reading and writing.

Dyslexia is a long-life condition. Early intervention and support is very important because it makes their journey successful. In addition, even though dyslexics learn to read accurately, they may continue to read slowly.

 Dyslexics are not lazy because their brains work five times harder when compared to others, which can result in frustration.

Many dyslexic people are gifted and are at the tops of their fields. Good examples include Albert Einstein, Richard Branson, Leonardo da Vinci, Walt Disney, Whoopi Goldberg and George Bush. Moreover, according to the International Dyslexia Organisation, individuals with Dyslexia have average to above average intelligence.

There are as many girls as boys with Dyslexia.

Do I have dyslexia?

Do you think you may have dyslexia? Please click one of the buttons below based on your age and take the screening now.

These are some people with Dyslexia.

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Dentaa Amoateng, MBE

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Leonardo Da'vinci

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Duncan Williams

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Rosalin A. Kyere-Nartey

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WHO ARE YOU TO THE CHILD ?

The Adult Reading History Questionnaire (ARHQ) is a screening tool designed to measure risk of reading disability (i.e. dyslexia) in adults (Lefly & Pennington, 2000), but it can also help measure risk in children, especially before school age. Reading disability is highly heritable: about 30-60% percent of children born to a dyslexic parent will develop dyslexia. Thus, one way to estimate risk of reading disability in preschool children is to evaluate parents’ own reading history. The following questionnaire was developed using parents’ reports of their own reading history as well as actual testing of their children’s reading skills. If a parent scores high on the ARHQ, their child has a higher risk of developing a reading disability. It is important to note that the ARHQ is only a screener and does not constitute a formal evaluation or diagnosis of either the parent or the child. If you have concerns about your child’s reading progress, we recommend that you contact your child’s school, a licensed child psychologist, or your child’s primary care physician about pursuing a more thorough evaluation to investigate the nature of these concerns.

The Colorado Learning Disabilities Questionnaire – Reading Subscale (CLDQ-R) is a screening tool designed to measure risk of reading disability (i.e. dyslexia) in school-age children (Willcutt, Boada, Riddle, Chhabildas, DeFries & Pennington, 2011). Normative scores for this questionnaire were developed based on parent-reports of their 6-18 year-old children, as well as actual reading testing of these children. Willcutt, et al. (2011) found that the CLDQ-R is reliable and valid. It is important to note that the CLDQ-R is only a screener and does not constitute a formal evaluation or diagnosis. If you have concerns about your child’s reading progress, we recommend that you contact your child’s school, a licensed child psychologist, or your child’s primary care physician about pursuing a more thorough evaluation to investigate the nature of these concerns. For more information about the symptoms, causes and treatment of reading disability (dyslexia), please visit the International Dyslexia Association

WHAT'S YOUR GENDER?

The Adult Reading History Questionnaire (ARHQ) is a self-report screening tool designed to measure risk of reading disability (i.e. dyslexia) in adults (Lefly & Pennington, 2000). The ARHQ asks adults about their own reading history and current reading habits in order to estimate the risk that they may have a reading disability. Normative scores are based on actual testing, and Lefly & Pennington (2000) found that the ARHQ is reliable and valid. It is important to note that the ARHQ is only a screener and does not constitute a formal evaluation or diagnosis. If you have concerns about your reading skills, we recommend that you contact a licensed psychologist or your primary care physician about pursuing a more thorough evaluation to investigate the nature of these concerns.